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Wednesday, 21 January 2015

Microsoft announces Project Spartan, the future of Windows 10 web browsing

Microsoft’s Internet Explorer is currently one of the biggest web browsers in the world, but not necessarily the world’s, or the most advanced. Over the last couple of years we’ve seen how Google Chrome, FireFox and even Apple’s Safari have evolved to add new features that were still missing on Internet Explorer. Today, Microsoft has announced a new Project Spartan to improve web browsing across all Windows 10 form factors, and even though we still don’t know if this will be an evolution of Internet Explorer or a new web browser, here are some of the improvements mentioned.
Joe Belfiore segregated the improvements in three categories:
Collaboration
– Spartan features collaboration between users. It allows different users to doodle over a web page simultaneously. It freezes the webpages when required, even though the links are still alive, and allows you to mark comments, doodle or whatever interacting tool is available for each user, be it touch, a stylus, or a keyboard.
– It has a built-in sharing system for Facebook and other social networks.
Reading
– Built-in reader, as we currently see on Safari, where a website is quickly enhanced by stripping away distractions and allowing users to focus on reading.
– Built-in reading list that works on whatever device you’re using, in order to allow you to read any post offline when needed.
– Built-in support for PDF files on the reading list.
Cortana built-in
– Cortana will pop-up when needed, like for example, when you touch the address bar.
– Cortana looks within webpages and provides useful information on whatever it detects. Like if a restaurant is recommended, Cortana will get you directions, opening hours, dietary information, etc.
Belfiore was clear that Project Spartan will only be available on the PC initially, but it should expand to mobile very soon. We’ll keep you posted as soon as we learn more. So far, the name Internet Explorer is still not being mentioned, so it could be that we’re getting a new browser.
Update: Joe Belfiore’s video clarifies that we’re looking at a new browser to replace Internet Explorer going forward, good news indeed.
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